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Tuesday
Nov042014

NEW Personal Financial Planning tool from AVMA!

Student AVMA members, it is time to get excited! The AVMA has created a brand new online tool, targeted specifically for AVMA members to assist with financial planning. Student loans are a hot topic amongst veterinary students and especially those recent graduates who are beginning their loan repayments. The AVMA Personal Financial Planning (PFP) tool has taken the headache out of financial planning! It gives you an easy way to organize your finances, while also taking into account the specific budget concerns of veterinarians. Now it’s possible to plan for not only your current expenses, but also your long term financial and career goals. This tool makes it easy for anyone to set up a budget, walking you through the essential steps for set up in no time at all.

As students, we need to think of the future, loan repayment, and retirement planning. This tool makes it easy to start now while sitting at home on your computer. It doesn’t involve going to a financial planner, it involves you at home inputting your own information, getting feedback as soon as you click “submit”.  For students, the scenario mode is especially applicable. You can see how your budget would change based on income level and amount of debt. The folks at AVMA have made the PFP very user friendly for us, and have gone above and beyond with even more advanced financial planning tools at your disposal. A few of the extras that SAVMA students can utilize include a veterinary salary calculator, cost of living comparisons, rent or buy calculator, credit card calculator, automobile cost of ownership, and tips on how to stand out in your new job. They have really listened to the concerns of students and practitioners alike and delivered something great!

As SAVMA members we are fortunate to have access to this wonderful financial planning tool as part of our yearly membership. It can be accessed using your SAVMA ID at avma.org/mybudget.


 

 

Monday
Nov032014

Forget the Swag, Just Gimme the Bag!

Tony Nitido, Western University

Creative Corner, Entry

 

"It doesn't matter how many toys and treats I bring home, it's what's holding them all that counts for this little one!"

Saturday
Nov012014

"Foggy Days"

Emily Swan, Oregon State

Creative Corner, Entry

  "Foggy Days", a digital painting

Thursday
Oct302014

Autumn Train Ride

Christina Tataryn, Western University

Creative Corner, Entry

Wednesday
Oct292014

Youth Camp in the Sierra Nevada Mountains

Kathryn Cehrs, Iowa State

Life As a Vet Student, Entry

 

My most random job occurred in the summer of 2012. I lifeguarded for a week at an Armenian Orthodox Youth Camp in the Sierra Nevada mountains in California (Hye Camp). This might not seem unusual except that I am not Armenian, related to any Armenians, or in a relationship with an Armenian. I was one of 4 people in the camp who did not have dark hair. It was an odd feeling being the only non-Armenian in a camp with over 100 people. I felt very ignorant at first. I wasn’t even sure if Armenia was an independent nation (it is) or a region in a different country (not). I had a vague idea where the country was located (near Turkey), but I couldn’t find it on a map.

Despite being the odd one out in the camp, I had a great opportunity to learn about another culture. The Armenians are fiercely proud of their heritage, something I am not familiar with as my heritage is mixed and far removed from Europe. As a whole, they are very highly educated and high achievers. And their food is fantastic, even though my tongue hurt a little from the amount of lemon and garlic. They had backgammon tournaments, a history hour, cooking and dancing lessons along with the more typical summer camp activities. I spent most of my time down at the waterfront on the job, but still had time to participate in a lot of the activities. My favorite was the traditional Armenian dancing. It was a ton of fun and involved fast music and a lot of fancy footwork.

Overall it was a great experience and I learned a lot: about their culture, and also how to relate to people I knew little about.